GoldenEye 007 is unbanned in Germany after 24 years

Prior to its release, Germany classified GoldenEye as “media harmful to young persons” and included it on a list of games that were banned from being sold or marketed in the country for 25 years. But it’s only been 24 years, and the game’s now unbanned…


Prior to its release, Germany classified GoldenEye as "media harmful to young persons" and included it on a list of games that were banned from being sold or marketed in the country for 25 years. But it’s only been 24 years, and the game’s now unbanned.

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Researchers bypass optic nerve, deliver images directly to blind woman’s brain

Berna Gomez’s world was turned upside down when she was diagnosed with toxic optic neuropathy at age 42. The rapidly progressing disease deteriorated the Spanish science teacher’s optic nerves and rendered her blind in a matter of days. Thanks to resea…


Berna Gomez's world was turned upside down when she was diagnosed with toxic optic neuropathy at age 42. The rapidly progressing disease deteriorated the Spanish science teacher's optic nerves and rendered her blind in a matter of days. Thanks to researchers from the University of Utah and Miguel Hernandez University...

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Intel’s flagship Arc Alchemist GPU poses for the camera

If you’ve been following the Arc Alchemist leaks, then the photos might look familiar. The YouTuber that published them, Moore’s Law Is Dead, also published photos of an earlier prototype that had a similar shape but a black shroud and a green PCB a fe…


If you’ve been following the Arc Alchemist leaks, then the photos might look familiar. The YouTuber that published them, Moore’s Law Is Dead, also published photos of an earlier prototype that had a similar shape but a black shroud and a green PCB a few months ago. The design is...

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Intel looks past Alder Lake, says faster processors on the horizon

Pat Gelsinger may be a lot of things, but shy isn’t one of them. In an interview with CRN, the blue-team leader pulled no punches, proclaiming Intel’s dominance and asserting that Alder Lake & future technologies will mark the end of AMD’s current …


Pat Gelsinger may be a lot of things, but shy isn't one of them. In an interview with CRN, the blue-team leader pulled no punches, proclaiming Intel's dominance and asserting that Alder Lake & future technologies will mark the end of AMD's current desktop and mobile market dominance. Earlier this...

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Boston Dynamics shows its quadruped Spot has what it takes to be a TikTok star

I remember being amazed and somewhat disturbed when it learned how to open doors. Now it can operate a rickshaw, clean house, weed the garden, jump rope, pee beer into a cup, and work for the NYPD (temporarily).


I remember being amazed and somewhat disturbed when it learned how to open doors. Now it can operate a rickshaw, clean house, weed the garden, jump rope, pee beer into a cup, and work for the NYPD (temporarily).

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Remote code execution vulnerability found in older versions of WinRAR, update it now

Web security researcher Igor Sak-Sakovskiy published an article on October 20 detailing the WinRAR vulnerability with the assigned Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures ID CVE-2021-35052. The vulnerability affects WinRAR trial version 5.70, but not the …


Web security researcher Igor Sak-Sakovskiy published an article on October 20 detailing the WinRAR vulnerability with the assigned Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures ID CVE-2021-35052. The vulnerability affects WinRAR trial version 5.70, but not the latest iteration (v. 6.02), which developers updated in July. You can download it from TechSpot downloads...

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Building a Keyboard 6: MOMOKA Switches/Keycaps + Epomaker Skyloong GK87 Kit

It’s autumn in the Northern hemisphere, so get cozy and start building a custom keyboard with me! Today, we go through two different switches and two different keycap sets from the Japanese upstart MOMOKA, and pair it with a TKL kit from Epomaker/Skylo…

It's autumn in the Northern hemisphere, so get cozy and start building a custom keyboard with me! Today, we go through two different switches and two different keycap sets from the Japanese upstart MOMOKA, and pair it with a TKL kit from Epomaker/Skyloong.

Activision CEO cuts own pay to $62,500 amid company’s sexual harassment lawsuit

In a letter published on Activision Blizzard’s investor relations page, Kotick asks the board of directors to cut his total compensation to $62,500 until it determines the company has achieved “transformational gender-related goals” along with a series…


In a letter published on Activision Blizzard's investor relations page, Kotick asks the board of directors to cut his total compensation to $62,500 until it determines the company has achieved "transformational gender-related goals" along with a series of commitments he lays out in the letter. Kotick also asked to receive...

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US Copyright Office grants right to repair video game consoles as long as only the optical drive is broken

The US Copyright Office says that consumers shall now be allowed to repair software-controlled devices as long as they do not modify their original specifications. That is to say, if you legally purchased a product, you are allowed to repair it without…


The US Copyright Office says that consumers shall now be allowed to repair software-controlled devices as long as they do not modify their original specifications. That is to say, if you legally purchased a product, you are allowed to repair it without sending it off to the manufacturer as long...

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Pulsar Xlite Wireless Review

Aside from introducing wireless functionality, the Xlite Wireless also comes with updated Kailh GM 8.0 main button switches and larger pure PTFE feet. Weighing just 59 g, the Xlite Wireless nonetheless has up to 70 hours of battery life owing to PixArt…

Aside from introducing wireless functionality, the Xlite Wireless also comes with updated Kailh GM 8.0 main button switches and larger pure PTFE feet. Weighing just 59 g, the Xlite Wireless nonetheless has up to 70 hours of battery life owing to PixArt's PAW3370.

NASA’s Juno probe provides additional insight about gas giant Jupiter

Since entering Jupiter’s orbit, Juno has made 37 passes of the planet to date. Each time, the craft utilizes a set of specialized instruments to learn more about the largest planet in our solar system.


Since entering Jupiter’s orbit, Juno has made 37 passes of the planet to date. Each time, the craft utilizes a set of specialized instruments to learn more about the largest planet in our solar system.

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Intel briefly demoes XeSS supersampling tech in Hitman 3, The Riftbreaker

There are still a lot of unknowns about Team Blue’s gaming-oriented Xe-HPG architecture, but the company pretty much confirms some of the rumors we’ve heard over the past several months. Alchemist GPUs will come in several tiers covering different pric…


There are still a lot of unknowns about Team Blue’s gaming-oriented Xe-HPG architecture, but the company pretty much confirms some of the rumors we’ve heard over the past several months. Alchemist GPUs will come in several tiers covering different price points, but there will also be a full-fat variant that...

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Teenage Engineering releases mini-ITX PC case that you can build yourself

On the outside, the computer-1 can catch anyone’s attention with its pure orange RAL 2004 powder-coated finish. The chrome handles allow easy transport from one place to the other with no hassle.


On the outside, the computer-1 can catch anyone's attention with its pure orange RAL 2004 powder-coated finish. The chrome handles allow easy transport from one place to the other with no hassle.

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Cricket drops 8Mbps speed cap and adds 5G access to all rate plans

Cricket Wireless in celebration of its latest subscriber milestone has “tuned up” its rate plans, removing speed caps and adding 5G network access where applicable. Here’s everything you need to know.


Cricket Wireless in celebration of its latest subscriber milestone has “tuned up” its rate plans, removing speed caps and adding 5G network access where applicable. Here’s everything you need to know.

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Thermaltake Divider 200 TG Air Snow Review

The Thermaltake Divider 200 TG Air is the airflow version of the Divider 200 TG by replacing the glass front with a uniquely designed, vented steel panel. It is an mATX chassis for the Divider family, but looks vastly different from the 300 or 500 seri…

The Thermaltake Divider 200 TG Air is the airflow version of the Divider 200 TG by replacing the glass front with a uniquely designed, vented steel panel. It is an mATX chassis for the Divider family, but looks vastly different from the 300 or 500 series due to its uniquely stacked internal layout and cube shape.

Leaked image shows Facebook’s notch-sporting Meta smartwatch

The image was discovered by app developer Steve Moser and published by Bloomberg. Moser found it inside Facebook’s app for its Ray-Ban Stories smart glasses, suggesting the same app could be used to control the watch once it’s released.


The image was discovered by app developer Steve Moser and published by Bloomberg. Moser found it inside Facebook’s app for its Ray-Ban Stories smart glasses, suggesting the same app could be used to control the watch once it’s released.

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Bringing Geek Back: Q&A with Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger

One of the overriding key themes of Pat Gelsinger’s ten-month tenure at Intel has been the eponymous will to ‘bring geek back’ to the company, implying a return to Intel’s competitive past which relied on the expertise of its e…

One of the overriding key themes of Pat Gelsinger’s ten-month tenure at Intel has been the eponymous will to ‘bring geek back’ to the company, implying a return to Intel’s competitive past which relied on the expertise of its engineers to develop market-leading products. During this time, Pat has showcased Intel’s IDM 2.0 strategy, leveraging internal production, external production, and an update to Intel’s foundry offering, making it a cornerstone of Intel’s next decade of growth. The first major launch of this decade happened this week, at Intel’s Innovation event, with the announcement of 12th Gen Core, as well as updates to Intel’s software strategy up and down the company.

After the event, Intel invited several media and an analyst or two onto a group session with CEO Pat, along with CTO Greg Lavender, a recent new CTO hire coming from Pat’s old stomping ground at VMWare. In light of the announcements made at Intel Innovation, as well as the financial quarterly results released just the week prior, and the state of the semiconductor supply globally, everyone had Intel at the forefront of their minds, ready to ask for details on Intel’s plan. 

Supply chain constraints finally catch up as global smartphone shipments dipped 6.7 percent in Q3

Preliminary data from its Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker report shows that smartphone vendors collectively shipped 331.2 million handsets during the third quarter of 2021. That’s down 6.7 percent from the 354.9 million units shipped during th…


Preliminary data from its Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker report shows that smartphone vendors collectively shipped 331.2 million handsets during the third quarter of 2021. That’s down 6.7 percent from the 354.9 million units shipped during the same period a year earlier.

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Updated: Intel Cans Xe-HP Server GPU Products, Shifts Focus To Xe-HPC and Xe-HPG

Update 11/01:

In an additional tweet posted over the weekend by Raja Koduri, the Intel GPU frontman confirmed that Intel will be bringing products based on their Xe-HPG architecture to the server market.

Painting very broad strokes here from a 280 character announcement, it sounds like Intel will take a very similar tack as NVIDIA for their initial generation of products. That means offering Ponte Vecchio (Xe-HPC) for HPC and high performance AI training, while using the Alchemist (Xe-HPG) products for less intense/more scalable tasks such as AI inference and server-based graphics. All of which leaves me even more curious if Intel has retained Xe-HP’s tile capabilities for Xe-HPG.

With his tweet, Koduri also included a slightly updated version of one of Intel’s Xe-HPG slides, which now includes the server graphics role.

Original Story (10/29):

In a tweet published yesterday afternoon by Raja Koduri, Intel’s SVP and GM of the Accelerated Computing Systems and Graphics (AXG) Group, the GPU frontman revealed that Intel has dropped their plans to bring their Xe-HP series of server GPUs to the commercial market. Citing that Xe-HP has evolved into the Xe-HPC (Ponte Vecchio) and Xe-HPG (Intel Arc) families within Intel’s GPU group, the company seemingly no longer sees a need to release a second set of server GPUs – at least, not something based on Xe-HP as we know it.

Also known by the codename Arctic Sound, Intel’s initial family of server GPUs has been the most visible product under development from Intel’s reborn GPU group. Koduri frequently showed off chips housing the silicon as it was brought-up in Intel’s labs. And, Xe-LP/DG1 excepted, this was the first high-performance Xe silicon that Intel developed. Notably, it was also the only high-performance Xe silicon slated to be manufactured by Intel; Xe-HPC’s compute tiles and Xe-HPG dies are both being built by TSMC.

We haven’t heard much of Xe-HP this year, and in retrospect that was a sign that something was amiss. Still, as of year Intel had been showing off Xe-HP demos with performance as high as 42 TFLOPS of FP32 throughput. And in November the company announced that Xe-HP was sampling to select customers.

But, as it would seem, Xe-HP just isn’t meant to be. For 2021 Intel has been focused on getting Ponte Vecchio assembled for the Aurora supercomputer (and eventually other customers), as well as bringing up the Xe-HPG Alchemist GPU family for Q1 of 2022. According to Koduri, Xe-HP has been leveraged as a development vehicle for Aurora and Intel’s oneAPI – so it hasn’t gone unused – but that’s as far as Xe-HP has made it.

For now, the cancellation of Xe-HP raises some big questions about Intel’s server GPU plans. Xe-HP was intended to be the backbone of their server efforts, utilizing a scalable design that could range from one to four cores to serve datacenter needs ranging from compute to media processing. Between Xe-HP and Ponte Vecchio covering the very high end of the market (e.g. HPC), Intel was slated to develop a potent slate of parallel processors to compete with market-leader NVIDIA, and offer traditional Intel customers a GPU option that let them stay in Intel’s ecosystem.

At this point it’s not clear what will fill the void left by Xe-HP in Intel’s product stack. Ponte Vecchio is in production now, and judging from Intel’s revised Aurora figures, is performing better than expected. But the massive chip is expensive to build – at least in its current configuration. And while Xe-HPG could be called up for server use next year, unless Intel is able to tile it like Xe-HP, they won’t be able to offer the kind of performance that Xe-HP was slated to deliver.

Equally nebulous is a full understanding of why Intel opted to cancel Xe-HP. With the silicon already up and running, canceling it certainly sets back their server GPU plans. But as AMD has already begun rolling out their new CDNA2 architecture-based server GPU products, and NVIDIA is likely aiming for some kind of refresh of their own in 2022, there’s certainly the question of whether Xe-HP was simply too late and/or too slow to compete in the server market. Coupled with that, it’s the only lineup of high-performance Xe parts that Intel was fabbing themselves, using the 10nm Enhanced Superfin process (now referred to as Intel 7).

In any case, Intel is clearly not giving up on their plans to break into the server GPU market, even if pieces of that plan now need to be rewritten. We’ve reached out to Intel for additional details, and we’ll update this story further if Intel releases a more detailed statement on their server GPU plans.

Update 11/01:

In an additional tweet posted over the weekend by Raja Koduri, the Intel GPU frontman confirmed that Intel will be bringing products based on their Xe-HPG architecture to the server market.

Painting very broad strokes here from a 280 character announcement, it sounds like Intel will take a very similar tack as NVIDIA for their initial generation of products. That means offering Ponte Vecchio (Xe-HPC) for HPC and high performance AI training, while using the Alchemist (Xe-HPG) products for less intense/more scalable tasks such as AI inference and server-based graphics. All of which leaves me even more curious if Intel has retained Xe-HP’s tile capabilities for Xe-HPG.

With his tweet, Koduri also included a slightly updated version of one of Intel's Xe-HPG slides, which now includes the server graphics role.

Original Story (10/29):

In a tweet published yesterday afternoon by Raja Koduri, Intel’s SVP and GM of the Accelerated Computing Systems and Graphics (AXG) Group, the GPU frontman revealed that Intel has dropped their plans to bring their Xe-HP series of server GPUs to the commercial market. Citing that Xe-HP has evolved into the Xe-HPC (Ponte Vecchio) and Xe-HPG (Intel Arc) families within Intel’s GPU group, the company seemingly no longer sees a need to release a second set of server GPUs – at least, not something based on Xe-HP as we know it.

Also known by the codename Arctic Sound, Intel’s initial family of server GPUs has been the most visible product under development from Intel’s reborn GPU group. Koduri frequently showed off chips housing the silicon as it was brought-up in Intel’s labs. And, Xe-LP/DG1 excepted, this was the first high-performance Xe silicon that Intel developed. Notably, it was also the only high-performance Xe silicon slated to be manufactured by Intel; Xe-HPC’s compute tiles and Xe-HPG dies are both being built by TSMC.

We haven’t heard much of Xe-HP this year, and in retrospect that was a sign that something was amiss. Still, as of year Intel had been showing off Xe-HP demos with performance as high as 42 TFLOPS of FP32 throughput. And in November the company announced that Xe-HP was sampling to select customers.

But, as it would seem, Xe-HP just isn’t meant to be. For 2021 Intel has been focused on getting Ponte Vecchio assembled for the Aurora supercomputer (and eventually other customers), as well as bringing up the Xe-HPG Alchemist GPU family for Q1 of 2022. According to Koduri, Xe-HP has been leveraged as a development vehicle for Aurora and Intel’s oneAPI – so it hasn’t gone unused – but that’s as far as Xe-HP has made it.

For now, the cancellation of Xe-HP raises some big questions about Intel’s server GPU plans. Xe-HP was intended to be the backbone of their server efforts, utilizing a scalable design that could range from one to four cores to serve datacenter needs ranging from compute to media processing. Between Xe-HP and Ponte Vecchio covering the very high end of the market (e.g. HPC), Intel was slated to develop a potent slate of parallel processors to compete with market-leader NVIDIA, and offer traditional Intel customers a GPU option that let them stay in Intel’s ecosystem.

At this point it’s not clear what will fill the void left by Xe-HP in Intel’s product stack. Ponte Vecchio is in production now, and judging from Intel’s revised Aurora figures, is performing better than expected. But the massive chip is expensive to build – at least in its current configuration. And while Xe-HPG could be called up for server use next year, unless Intel is able to tile it like Xe-HP, they won’t be able to offer the kind of performance that Xe-HP was slated to deliver.

Equally nebulous is a full understanding of why Intel opted to cancel Xe-HP. With the silicon already up and running, canceling it certainly sets back their server GPU plans. But as AMD has already begun rolling out their new CDNA2 architecture-based server GPU products, and NVIDIA is likely aiming for some kind of refresh of their own in 2022, there’s certainly the question of whether Xe-HP was simply too late and/or too slow to compete in the server market. Coupled with that, it’s the only lineup of high-performance Xe parts that Intel was fabbing themselves, using the 10nm Enhanced Superfin process (now referred to as Intel 7).

In any case, Intel is clearly not giving up on their plans to break into the server GPU market, even if pieces of that plan now need to be rewritten. We’ve reached out to Intel for additional details, and we’ll update this story further if Intel releases a more detailed statement on their server GPU plans.