Kingston A2000 1 TB M.2 NVMe SSD Review – 8% Faster Thanks to New Firmware

The Kingston A2000 has recently received a firmware update, which makes a big difference in performance. It now rivals the Samsung 970 EVO, at much better pricing. With just $128 for the tested 1 TB version, or 13 cents per GB, the A2000 offers better …

The Kingston A2000 has recently received a firmware update, which makes a big difference in performance. It now rivals the Samsung 970 EVO, at much better pricing. With just $128 for the tested 1 TB version, or 13 cents per GB, the A2000 offers better value than most SSDs on the market.

Best Android Phones: November 2021

We’re nearing the end of the year and the holiday season, and all relevant devices for 2021 have seen their releases, and we’re entering a period of quiet before the industry sees larger refreshes early next year.

The biggest shake-up i…

We’re nearing the end of the year and the holiday season, and all relevant devices for 2021 have seen their releases, and we’re entering a period of quiet before the industry sees larger refreshes early next year.

The biggest shake-up in the last few weeks has been Google’s releases of the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro. Although the phones are solid and shine in some aspects, their real strength has been in their pricing, which Google offering very compelling value, especially for US readers. This changed up our recommendations at the top-end quite a bit for this month:

The Samsung 870 QVO (1TB & 4TB) SSD Review: QLC Refreshed

Samsung’s second-generation QLC NAND is here, but it’s still held back by a SATA interface. The new Samsung 870 QVO is probably big enough to be your only SSD, but may not be fast enough to satisfy.

Samsung's second-generation QLC NAND is here, but it's still held back by a SATA interface. The new Samsung 870 QVO is probably big enough to be your only SSD, but may not be fast enough to satisfy.

Qualcomm Announces New Snapdragon Wear 4100 & 4100+: 12nm A53 Smartwatches

Today Qualcomm is making a big step forward in its smartwatch SoC offerings by introducing the brand-new Snapdragon Wear 4100 and Wear 4100+ platforms. The new chips succeed the aging two 2018 originating Wear 3100 platforms and significantl…

Today Qualcomm is making a big step forward in its smartwatch SoC offerings by introducing the brand-new Snapdragon Wear 4100 and Wear 4100+ platforms. The new chips succeed the aging two 2018 originating Wear 3100 platforms and significantly upgrading the hardware specifications, bringing to the table all new IPs for CPU, GPU and DSPs, all manufactured on a newer lower power process node.

CORSAIR iCUE LT100 Smart Lighting Towers Review – RGB Your Desk!

CORSAIR adds to their ecosystem of RGB goodies with the iCUE LT100 smart lighting towers. Complementing the LS100 lighting strips, you can add 2–4 towers with 46 dRGB LEDs each in the living room, on your PC desk around your monitor, or anywhere with a…

CORSAIR adds to their ecosystem of RGB goodies with the iCUE LT100 smart lighting towers. Complementing the LS100 lighting strips, you can add 2–4 towers with 46 dRGB LEDs each in the living room, on your PC desk around your monitor, or anywhere with an AC wall socket for a dazzling light show.

400 TB Storage Drives In Our Future: Fujifilm

One of the two leading manufacturers of tape cartridge storage, FujiFilm, claims that they have a technology roadmap through to 2031 which builds on the current magnetic tape paradigm to enable 400 TB per tape.

One of the two leading manufacturers of tape cartridge storage, FujiFilm, claims that they have a technology roadmap through to 2031 which builds on the current magnetic tape paradigm to enable 400 TB per tape.

AMD Publishes First Beta Driver With Windows 10 Hardware GPU Scheduling Support

Following last week’s release of NVIDIA’s first Hardware-Accelerated GPU Scheduling-enabled video card driver, AMD this week has stepped up to the plate to do the same. The Radeon Software Adrenalin 2020 Edition 20.5.1 Beta with Graphics Hardware Scheduling driver (version 20.10.17.04) has been posted to AMD’s website, and as the name says on the tin, the driver offers support for Windows 10’s new hardware-accelerated GPU scheduling technology.

As a quick refresher, hardware acceleration for GPU scheduling was added to the Windows display driver stack with WDDM 2.7 (shipping in Win10 2004). And, as alluded to by the name, it allows GPUs to more directly manage their VRAM. Traditionally Windows itself has done a lot of the VRAM management for GPUs, so this is a distinctive change in matters.

Microsoft has been treating the feature as a relatively low-key development – relative to DirectX 12 Ultimate, they haven’t said a whole lot about it – meanwhile AMD’s release notes make vague performance improvement claims, stating “By moving scheduling responsibilities from software into hardware, this feature has the potential to improve GPU responsiveness and to allow additional innovation in GPU workload management in the future”. As was the case with NVIDIA’s release last week, don’t expect anything too significant here, otherwise AMD would be more heavily promoting the performance gains. But it’s something to keep an eye on over the long term.

In the meantime, AMD seems to be taking a cautious approach here. The beta driver has been published outside their normal release channels and only supports products using AMD’s Navi 10 GPUs – so the Radeon 5700 series, 5600 series, and their mobile variants. Support for the Navi 14-based 5500 series is notably absent, as is Vega support for both discrete and integrated GPUs.

Additional details about the driver release, as well as download instructions, can be found on AMD’s website in the driver release notes.

Finally, on a tangential note, I’m aiming to sit down with The Powers That Be over the next week or so in order to better dig into hardware-accelerated GPU scheduling. Since it’s mostly a hardware developer-focused feature, Microsoft hasn’t talked about it much in the consumer context or with press. So I’ll be diving into more on the theory behind it: what it’s meant to do, future feature prospects, and as well as the rationale for introducing it now as opposed to earlier (or later). Be sure to check back in next week for that.

Following last week’s release of NVIDIA’s first Hardware-Accelerated GPU Scheduling-enabled video card driver, AMD this week has stepped up to the plate to do the same. The Radeon Software Adrenalin 2020 Edition 20.5.1 Beta with Graphics Hardware Scheduling driver (version 20.10.17.04) has been posted to AMD’s website, and as the name says on the tin, the driver offers support for Windows 10’s new hardware-accelerated GPU scheduling technology.

As a quick refresher, hardware acceleration for GPU scheduling was added to the Windows display driver stack with WDDM 2.7 (shipping in Win10 2004). And, as alluded to by the name, it allows GPUs to more directly manage their VRAM. Traditionally Windows itself has done a lot of the VRAM management for GPUs, so this is a distinctive change in matters.

Microsoft has been treating the feature as a relatively low-key development – relative to DirectX 12 Ultimate, they haven’t said a whole lot about it – meanwhile AMD’s release notes make vague performance improvement claims, stating “By moving scheduling responsibilities from software into hardware, this feature has the potential to improve GPU responsiveness and to allow additional innovation in GPU workload management in the future”. As was the case with NVIDIA’s release last week, don’t expect anything too significant here, otherwise AMD would be more heavily promoting the performance gains. But it’s something to keep an eye on over the long term.

In the meantime, AMD seems to be taking a cautious approach here. The beta driver has been published outside their normal release channels and only supports products using AMD’s Navi 10 GPUs – so the Radeon 5700 series, 5600 series, and their mobile variants. Support for the Navi 14-based 5500 series is notably absent, as is Vega support for both discrete and integrated GPUs.

Additional details about the driver release, as well as download instructions, can be found on AMD’s website in the driver release notes.

Finally, on a tangential note, I'm aiming to sit down with The Powers That Be over the next week or so in order to better dig into hardware-accelerated GPU scheduling. Since it's mostly a hardware developer-focused feature, Microsoft hasn't talked about it much in the consumer context or with press. So I'll be diving into more on the theory behind it: what it's meant to do, future feature prospects, and as well as the rationale for introducing it now as opposed to earlier (or later). Be sure to check back in next week for that.

Cooler Master Masterbox TD500 Mesh Review – Airflow for the Masses

The Cooler Master Masterbox TD500 Mesh checks off all the right boxes for an appealing mass-market choice. With its sub-$100 price tag, three fans, RGB, and clean looks, it goes down the path of “trusted and true”, and it actually ends up being quite t…

The Cooler Master Masterbox TD500 Mesh checks off all the right boxes for an appealing mass-market choice. With its sub-$100 price tag, three fans, RGB, and clean looks, it goes down the path of "trusted and true", and it actually ends up being quite the confident stride for good reason.

Quick Look: Team Group T-Force Spark RGB 128 GB – RGB on Your Flash Drive

Just when you thought they’ve put RGB on everything, Team Group releases a RGB USB flash drive with the T-Force Spark RGB 128 GB. Our review goes into detail how the RGB works and what to expect performance-wise.

Just when you thought they've put RGB on everything, Team Group releases a RGB USB flash drive with the T-Force Spark RGB 128 GB. Our review goes into detail how the RGB works and what to expect performance-wise.

The OnePlus 8, OnePlus 8 Pro Review: Becoming The Flagship

It’s been a couple of months since OnePlus released the new OnePlus 8 & OnePlus 8 Pro, and both devices have received plenty of software updates improving the device’s experiences and camera qualities. Today, it’s time to finally…

It’s been a couple of months since OnePlus released the new OnePlus 8 & OnePlus 8 Pro, and both devices have received plenty of software updates improving the device’s experiences and camera qualities. Today, it’s time to finally go over the full review of both devices, which OnePlus no longer really calls “flagship killers”, but rather outright flagships.

The OnePlus 8, and especially the OnePlus 8 pro are big step-up redesigns from the company, significantly raising the bar in regards to the specifications and features of the phones. The OnePlus 8 Pro is essentially a check-marked wish-list of characteristics that were missing from last year’s OnePlus 7 Pro as the company has addressed some of its predecessors’ biggest criticisms. The slightly smaller and cheaper regular OnePlus 8 more closely follows its predecessors’ ethos as well as competitive pricing, all whilst adopting the new design language that’s been updated with this year’s devices.

ASUS Radeon RX 5700 XT TUF EVO Review – Improved Cooler, Tested

Our ASUS RX 5700 XT TUF EVO review takes a look at the new cooler design, which fixes the memory temperature problem of the original TUF without the “EVO”. The card is very solid and runs quietly with excellent GPU temperatures and idle-fan stop.

Our ASUS RX 5700 XT TUF EVO review takes a look at the new cooler design, which fixes the memory temperature problem of the original TUF without the "EVO". The card is very solid and runs quietly with excellent GPU temperatures and idle-fan stop.

Best CPUs for Gaming: Holiday 2021

The launch of Intel’s 12th Gen Alder Lake processors has shaken up the market in the eternal battle against AMD, with seemingly a good number of processors to go around. The main limitations are still graphics cards for gaming, but also tho…

The launch of Intel’s 12th Gen Alder Lake processors has shaken up the market in the eternal battle against AMD, with seemingly a good number of processors to go around. The main limitations are still graphics cards for gaming, but also those looking for DDR5 are having to scout around as the dreaded ‘supply chain’ has limited how many modules have come to market. Nonetheless, platform costs aside, stock of both AMD’s Ryzen 5000 and Intel’s 12th Gen Alder Lake processors seems to be healthy, and both are aggressively priced.

HPC Systems Special Offer: Two A64FX Nodes in a 2U for $40k

It was recently announced that the Fugaku supercomputer, located at Riken in Japan, has scored the #1 position on the TOP500 supercomputer list, as well as #1 positions in a number of key supercomputer benchmarks. At the heart of Fugaku isn’t any standard x86 processor, but one based on Arm – specifically, the A64FX 48+4-core processor, which uses Arm’s Scalable Vector Extensions (SVE) to enable high-throughput FP64 compute. At 435 PetaFLOPs and 7.3 million cores, Fugaku beat the former #1 system by 2.8x in performance. Currently Fugaku has been used for COVID-19 related research, such as modelling tracking rates or virus in liquid droplet dispersion.

The Fujitsu A64FX card is a unique piece of kit, offering 48 compute cores and 4 control cores, each with monumental bandwidth to keep the 512-bit wide SVE units fed. The chip runs at 2.2 GHz, and can operate in FP64, FP32, FP16 and INT8 modes for a variety of AI applications. There is 1 TB/sec of bandwidth from the 32 GB of HBM2 on each card, and because there are four control cores per chip, it runs by itself without any external host/device situation.

It wasn’t ever clear if the A64FX module would be available on a wider scale beyond supercomputer sales, however today confirms that it is, with the Japanese based HPC Systems set to offer a Fujitsu PrimeHPC FX700 server that contains up to eight A64FX nodes (at 1.8 GHz) within a 2U form factor. Each note is paired with 512 GB of SSD storage and gigabit Ethernet capabilities, with room for expansion (Infiniband EDR etc). The current deal at HPC Systems is for a 2-node implementation, at a price of ¥4,155,330 (~$39000 USD), with the deal running to the end of the year.

The A64FX card already has listed support for quantum chemical calculation software Gaussian16, molecular dynamics software AMBER, non-linear structure analysis software LS-DYNA. Other commercial packages in the structure and fluid analysis fields will be coming on board in due course. There is also Fujitsu’s Software Compiler Package v1.0 to enable developers to build their own software.

Source: HPC Systems, PDF Flyer

Related Reading

 

It was recently announced that the Fugaku supercomputer, located at Riken in Japan, has scored the #1 position on the TOP500 supercomputer list, as well as #1 positions in a number of key supercomputer benchmarks. At the heart of Fugaku isn’t any standard x86 processor, but one based on Arm – specifically, the A64FX 48+4-core processor, which uses Arm’s Scalable Vector Extensions (SVE) to enable high-throughput FP64 compute. At 435 PetaFLOPs and 7.3 million cores, Fugaku beat the former #1 system by 2.8x in performance. Currently Fugaku has been used for COVID-19 related research, such as modelling tracking rates or virus in liquid droplet dispersion.

The Fujitsu A64FX card is a unique piece of kit, offering 48 compute cores and 4 control cores, each with monumental bandwidth to keep the 512-bit wide SVE units fed. The chip runs at 2.2 GHz, and can operate in FP64, FP32, FP16 and INT8 modes for a variety of AI applications. There is 1 TB/sec of bandwidth from the 32 GB of HBM2 on each card, and because there are four control cores per chip, it runs by itself without any external host/device situation.

It wasn’t ever clear if the A64FX module would be available on a wider scale beyond supercomputer sales, however today confirms that it is, with the Japanese based HPC Systems set to offer a Fujitsu PrimeHPC FX700 server that contains up to eight A64FX nodes (at 1.8 GHz) within a 2U form factor. Each note is paired with 512 GB of SSD storage and gigabit Ethernet capabilities, with room for expansion (Infiniband EDR etc). The current deal at HPC Systems is for a 2-node implementation, at a price of ¥4,155,330 (~$39000 USD), with the deal running to the end of the year.

The A64FX card already has listed support for quantum chemical calculation software Gaussian16, molecular dynamics software AMBER, non-linear structure analysis software LS-DYNA. Other commercial packages in the structure and fluid analysis fields will be coming on board in due course. There is also Fujitsu’s Software Compiler Package v1.0 to enable developers to build their own software.

Source: HPC Systems, PDF Flyer

Related Reading

 

ICY DOCK ICYNano MB861U31-1M2B NVMe USB-C Enclosure Review

Most M.2 NVMe drive enclosures can at most hold a 2280 drive. The ICY DOCK ICYNano MB861U31-1M2B, however, is meant to be used with up to a 22110 drive, which puts it squarely in that enterprise-grade spectrum occupying around 5% of the market.

Most M.2 NVMe drive enclosures can at most hold a 2280 drive. The ICY DOCK ICYNano MB861U31-1M2B, however, is meant to be used with up to a 22110 drive, which puts it squarely in that enterprise-grade spectrum occupying around 5% of the market.

Sponsored Post: Check Out all of the ASUS B550 Motherboards Available Now

The arrival of the AMD B550 chipset is an exciting prospect for PC builders, as it’s the first to bring the potential of PCIe 4.0 to the forefront for mainstream builders. ASUS has a diverse selection of new motherboards to choose from with this…

The arrival of the AMD B550 chipset is an exciting prospect for PC builders, as it’s the first to bring the potential of PCIe 4.0 to the forefront for mainstream builders. ASUS has a diverse selection of new motherboards to choose from with this chipset, and this useful B550 motherboard guide will help you figure out which one is right for you.

In ASUS B550 motherboards, the main PCIe x16 and M.2 slots are PCIe 4.0-capable. They also feature up to four USB 3.2 Gen 2 ports that clock in with a maximum supported speed of 10Gbps each. The chipset’s built-in lanes now have PCIe 3.0 connectivity as well, which is great to see. Additionally, AMD has noted that future CPUs built on the Zen 3 architecture will be fully compatible with B550 motherboards, making them a safe and long-lasting investment for people who wish to upgrade to those new processors down the line.

InWin C200 Review – Back to the Roots for Creators

The InWin C200 is aimed squarely at creators and professionals who require storage capabilities coupled with modern hardware support. Taking cues from times long past, InWin combines the layout of classic 5.25″ equipped enclosures from back in the day …

The InWin C200 is aimed squarely at creators and professionals who require storage capabilities coupled with modern hardware support. Taking cues from times long past, InWin combines the layout of classic 5.25" equipped enclosures from back in the day with modern accents, like a bottom-mounted PSU bay and metal shroud.

Quick Look: Vissles 2-in-1 Music Pill

The Vissles 2-in-1 Music Pill combines truly wireless in-ears with the ability to transfer the audio to a small 3W speaker within the charging case.

The Vissles 2-in-1 Music Pill combines truly wireless in-ears with the ability to transfer the audio to a small 3W speaker within the charging case.

Intel’s Raja Koduri Teases Even Larger Xe GPU Silicon

Absent from the discrete GPU space for over 20 years, this year Intel is set to see the first fruits from their labors to re-enter that market. The company has been developing their new Xe family of GPUs for a few years now, and the first products are finally set to arrive in the coming months with the Xe-LP-based DG1 discrete GPU, as well as Tiger Lake’s integrated GPU, kicking off the Xe GPU era for Intel.

But those first Xe-LP products are just the tip of a much larger iceberg. Intending to develop a comprehensive top-to-bottom GPU product stack, Intel is also working on GPUs optimized for the high-power discrete market (Xe-HP), as well as the high-performance computing market (Xe-HPC).

That high end of the market, in turn, is arguably the most important of the three segments for Intel, as well as being the riskiest. The server-class GPUs will be responsible for broadening Intel’s lucrative server business beyond CPUs, along with fending off NVIDIA and other GPU/accelerator rivals, who in the last few years have ridden the deep learning wave to booming profits and market shares that increasingly threaten Intel’s traditional market dominance. The server market is also the riskiest market, due to the high-stakes nature of the hardware: the only thing bigger than the profits are the chips, and thus the costs to enter the market. So under the watchful eye of Raja Koduri, Intel’s GPU guru, the company is gearing up to stage a major assault into the GPU space.

That brings us to the matter of this week’s teaser. One of the benefits of being a (relatively) upstart rival in the GPU business is that Intel doesn’t have any current-generation products that they need to protect; without the risk of Osborning themselves, they’re free to talk about their upcoming products even well before they ship. So, as a bit of a savvy social media ham, Koduri has been posting occasional photos of Intel’s Xe GPUs, as Intel brings them up in their labs.

BFP – big ‘fabulous’ package😀 pic.twitter.com/e0mwov1Ch1

— Raja Koduri (@Rajaontheedge) June 25, 2020

Today’s teaser from Koduri shows off a tray with three different Xe chips of different sizes. While detailed information about the Xe family is still limited, Intel has previously commented that the Xe-HPC-based Ponte Vecchio would be taking a chiplet route for the GPU, using multiple chiplets to build larger and more powerful designs. So while Koduri’s tweets don’t make it clear what specific GPUs we’re looking at – if they’re all part of the Xe-HP family or a mix of different families – the photo is an interesting hint that Intel may be looking at a wider use of chiplets, as the larger chip sizes roughly correlate to 1×2 and 2×2 configurations of the smallest chip.

And with presumably multiple chiplets under the hood, the resulting chips are quite sizable. With a helpful AA battery in the photo for reference, we can see that the smaller packages are around 50mm wide, while the largest package is easily approaching 85mm on a side.  (For refence, an Intel desktop CPU is around 37.5mm x 37.5mm).

Finally, in a separate tweet, Koduri quickly talks about performance: “And..they let me hold peta ops in my palm(almost:)!” Koduri doesn’t go into any detail about the numeric format involved – an important qualifier when talking about compute throughput on GPUs that can process lower-precision formats at higher rates – but we’ll be generous and assume INT8 operations. INT8 has become a fairly popular format for deep learning inference, as the integer format offers great performance for neural nets that don’t need high precision. NVIDIA’s A100 accelerator, for reference, tops out at 0.624 PetaOPs for regular tensor operations, or 1.248 PetaOps for a sparse matrix.

And that is the latest on Xe. With the higher-end discrete parts likely not shipping until later in 2021, this is likely not going to be the last word from Intel and Koduri on their first modern family of discrete GPUs.

Update: A previous version of the article called the large chip Ponte Vecchio, Intel’s Xe-HPC flagship. We have since come to understand that the silicon we’re seeing is likely not Ponte Vecchio, making it likely to be something Xe-HP based

Absent from the discrete GPU space for over 20 years, this year Intel is set to see the first fruits from their labors to re-enter that market. The company has been developing their new Xe family of GPUs for a few years now, and the first products are finally set to arrive in the coming months with the Xe-LP-based DG1 discrete GPU, as well as Tiger Lake’s integrated GPU, kicking off the Xe GPU era for Intel.

But those first Xe-LP products are just the tip of a much larger iceberg. Intending to develop a comprehensive top-to-bottom GPU product stack, Intel is also working on GPUs optimized for the high-power discrete market (Xe-HP), as well as the high-performance computing market (Xe-HPC).

That high end of the market, in turn, is arguably the most important of the three segments for Intel, as well as being the riskiest. The server-class GPUs will be responsible for broadening Intel’s lucrative server business beyond CPUs, along with fending off NVIDIA and other GPU/accelerator rivals, who in the last few years have ridden the deep learning wave to booming profits and market shares that increasingly threaten Intel’s traditional market dominance. The server market is also the riskiest market, due to the high-stakes nature of the hardware: the only thing bigger than the profits are the chips, and thus the costs to enter the market. So under the watchful eye of Raja Koduri, Intel’s GPU guru, the company is gearing up to stage a major assault into the GPU space.

That brings us to the matter of this week’s teaser. One of the benefits of being a (relatively) upstart rival in the GPU business is that Intel doesn’t have any current-generation products that they need to protect; without the risk of Osborning themselves, they’re free to talk about their upcoming products even well before they ship. So, as a bit of a savvy social media ham, Koduri has been posting occasional photos of Intel's Xe GPUs, as Intel brings them up in their labs.

Today’s teaser from Koduri shows off a tray with three different Xe chips of different sizes. While detailed information about the Xe family is still limited, Intel has previously commented that the Xe-HPC-based Ponte Vecchio would be taking a chiplet route for the GPU, using multiple chiplets to build larger and more powerful designs. So while Koduri's tweets don't make it clear what specific GPUs we're looking at – if they're all part of the Xe-HP family or a mix of different families – the photo is an interesting hint that Intel may be looking at a wider use of chiplets, as the larger chip sizes roughly correlate to 1x2 and 2x2 configurations of the smallest chip.

And with presumably multiple chiplets under the hood, the resulting chips are quite sizable. With a helpful AA battery in the photo for reference, we can see that the smaller packages are around 50mm wide, while the largest package is easily approaching 85mm on a side.  (For refence, an Intel desktop CPU is around 37.5mm x 37.5mm).

Finally, in a separate tweet, Koduri quickly talks about performance: “And..they let me hold peta ops in my palm(almost:)!” Koduri doesn’t go into any detail about the numeric format involved – an important qualifier when talking about compute throughput on GPUs that can process lower-precision formats at higher rates – but we’ll be generous and assume INT8 operations. INT8 has become a fairly popular format for deep learning inference, as the integer format offers great performance for neural nets that don’t need high precision. NVIDIA’s A100 accelerator, for reference, tops out at 0.624 PetaOPs for regular tensor operations, or 1.248 PetaOps for a sparse matrix.

And that is the latest on Xe. With the higher-end discrete parts likely not shipping until later in 2021, this is likely not going to be the last word from Intel and Koduri on their first modern family of discrete GPUs.

Update: A previous version of the article called the large chip Ponte Vecchio, Intel's Xe-HPC flagship. We have since come to understand that the silicon we're seeing is likely not Ponte Vecchio, making it likely to be something Xe-HP based

AMD Succeeds in its 25×20 Goal: Renoir Crosses the Line in 2020

One of the stories bubbling away in the background of the industry is the AMD self-imposed ‘25×20’ goal. Starting with performance in 2014, AMD committed to itself, to customers, and to investors that it would achieve an overall 25x improv…

One of the stories bubbling away in the background of the industry is the AMD self-imposed ‘25x20’ goal. Starting with performance in 2014, AMD committed to itself, to customers, and to investors that it would achieve an overall 25x improvement in ‘Performance Efficiency’ by 2020, which is a function of raw performance and power consumption. At the time AMD was defining its Kaveri mobile product as the baseline for the challenge – admittedly a very low bar – however each year AMD has updated us on its progress. With this year being 2020, the question on my lips ever since the launch of Zen2 for mobile was if AMD had achieved its goal, and if so, by how much? The answer is yes, and by a lot.

In this article we will recap the 25x20 project, how the metrics are calculated, and what this means for AMD in the long term.

$700 Best-Value Gaming PC Build Guide (Jun 2020)

In our latest PC Build Guide update, we take a look at delivering the best bang for the buck gaming PC we can at the $700 price point. No cutting corners, no compromises, this build will give users a jumping-off point for the best-possible performance …

In our latest PC Build Guide update, we take a look at delivering the best bang for the buck gaming PC we can at the $700 price point. No cutting corners, no compromises, this build will give users a jumping-off point for the best-possible performance without burning a hole in their wallet.